C-PTSD

I wrote a few articles for a site that offers support to people with personality disorders quite awhile ago. I decided to share the information about C-PTSD in here as well. 🙂

What is C-PTSD?
Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD) results from chronic or long-term exposure to emotional trauma over which a victim has little or no control and from which there is little or no hope of escape, such as in cases of:

  • domestic emotional, physical or sexual abuse
  • childhood emotional, physical or sexual abuse
  • entrapment or kidnapping.
  • slavery or enforced labour.
  • long term imprisonment and torture
  • repeated violations of personal boundaries.
  • exposure to gaslighting or false accusations.
  • long-term taking care of mentally ill or chronically sick family members.
  • long term exposure to crisis conditions.

When someone has been trapped in a situation and had little or no control at any point, they can carry an intense sense of dread even after that situation is removed. This is because they know how bad things can possibly be. And they know that it could possibly happen again.

The degree of C-PTSD trauma cannot be defined purely in terms of the trauma that a person has experienced. It is important to understand that each person is different and has a different tolerance level to trauma. Therefore, what one person may be able to shake off, another person may not. Therefore more or less exposure to trauma does not necessarily make the C-PTSD any more or less severe.

C-PTSD sufferers may “stuff” or suppress their emotional reaction to traumatic events without resolution either because they believe each event by itself doesn’t seem like such a big deal or because they see no satisfactory resolution opportunity available to them. This suppression of “emotional baggage” can continue for a long time either until a “last straw” event occurs, or a safer emotional environment emerges and the damn begins to break.

The “Complex” in Complex Post Traumatic Disorder describes how one layer after another of trauma can interact with one another. Sometimes, it is mistakenly assumed that the most recent traumatic event in a person’s life is the one that brought them to their knees. However, just addressing that single most-recent event may possibly be an invalidating experience for the C-PTSD sufferer. Therefore, it is important to recognize that those who suffer from C-PTSD may be experiencing feelings from all their traumatic exposure, even as they try to address the most recent traumatic event.

This is what differentiates C-PTSD from the classic PTSD diagnosis – which typically describes an emotional response to a single or to a discrete number of traumatic events.

What is the difference between PTSD and C-PTSD?
Although similar, Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD) differs slightly from the more commonly understood & diagnosed condition Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in causes and symptoms.

C-PTSD results more from chronic repetitive stress from which there is little chance of escape. PTSD can result from single events, or short term exposure to extreme stress or trauma.

Therefore a soldier returning from intense battle may be likely to show PTSD symptoms, but a kidnapped prisoner of war who was held for several years may show additional symptoms of C-PTSD.

Similarly, a child who witnesses a friend’s death in an accident may exhibit some symptoms of PTSD but a child who grows up in an abusive home may exhibit the additional C-PTSD characteristics shown below:

C-PTSD – What it Feels Like:
People who suffer from C-PTSD may feel un-centered and shaky, as if they are likely to have an embarrassing emotional breakdown or burst into tears at any moment. They may feel unloved – or that nothing they can accomplish is ever going to be “good enough” for others.

People who suffer from C-PTSD may feel compelled to get away from others and be by themselves, so that no-one will witness what may come next. They may feel afraid to form close friendships to prevent possible loss should another catastrophe strike.

People who suffer from C-PTSD may feel that everything is just about to go “out the window” and that they will not be able to handle even the simplest task. They may be too distracted by what is going on at home to focus on being successful at school or in the workplace.

C-PTSD Characteristics
How it can manifest in the victim(s) over time:

Avoidance – The practice of withdrawing from relationships with other people as a defensive measure to reduce the risk of rejection, accountability, criticism or exposure.

Blaming – The practice of identifying a person or people responsible for creating a problem, rather than identifying ways of dealing with the problem.

Catastrophizing – The habit of automatically assuming a “worst case scenario” and inappropriately characterizing minor or moderate problems or issues as catastrophic events.

“Control Me” Syndrome – This describes a tendency which some people have to foster relationships with people who have a controlling narcissistic, antisocial or “acting-out” nature.

Denial – Believing or imagining that some painful or traumatic circumstance, event or memory does not exist or did not happen.

Dependency – An inappropriate and chronic reliance by an adult individual on another individual for their health, subsistence, decision making or personal and emotional well-being.

Depression – Depression is when you feel sadder than your circumstances dictate, for longer than your circumstances last, but still can’t seem to break out of it.

Fear of Abandonment – An irrational belief that one is imminent danger of being personally rejected, discarded or replaced. – Maintaining an unhealthy level of interest in the behaviours, comments, thoughts and interests of others.

Identity Disturbance – A psychological term used to describe a distorted or inconsistent self-view.

Learned Helplessness – Learned helplessness is when a person begins to believe that they have no control over a situation, even when they do.

Low Self-Esteem – A common name for a negatively-distorted self-view which is inconsistent with reality.

Panic Attacks – Short intense episodes of fear or anxiety, often accompanied by physical symptoms, such as hyperventilating, shaking, sweating and chills.

Perfectionism – The maladaptive practice of holding oneself or others to an unrealistic, unattainable or unsustainable standard of organization, order, or accomplishment in one particular area of living, while sometimes neglecting common standards of organization, order or accomplishment in other areas of living.

Rage turned inward: Eating disorders. Depression. Substance Abuse / Alcoholism. Truancy. Dropping out. Promiscuity. Co-dependence. Doormat syndrome (choosing poor partners, trying to please someone who can never be pleased, trying to resolve the primal relationship)

Rage turned outward: Theft. Destruction of property. Violence. Becoming a control freak.

Self-Loathing – An extreme hatred of one’s own self, actions or one’s ethnic or demographic background.

Tunnel Vision – The habit or tendency to only see or focus on a single priority while neglecting or ignoring other important priorities.

The Cause of C-PTSD.

C-PTSD is caused by a prolonged or sustained exposure to emotional trauma or abuse from which no short-term means of escape is available or apparent to the victim.

The precise neurological damage that exists in C-PTSD victims is not well understood.

Military

18 responses to “C-PTSD

  1. Reblogged this on adifferentlifebeinglived and commented:
    Please read. Very informative.

    Like

  2. Reblogged this. Thank you so much.

    Like

  3. That quote, Wow, so chilling, I do not have PTSD but I have a lot of friends that do, we were all apart of the same unit when I served, It makes your quote stand out that much more. Thanks for the enlightenment.

    Like

    • Thank you so much for your comment. It is nice to know when I touch someone in some way.
      I think it can be hard for people to understand that PTSD is the exact same no matter how you got it. When people ask me if I served, I say no. My war was at home.
      Thank you for your service and I am very glad that you did not develop PTSD while serving. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • You know after reading some of those symptoms I am not so sure, but I am coming to understand like the post says some deal with it differently than others but your trauma is your trauma. I really do appreciate this post 🙂

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      • In my opinion (and it is only an opinion), I do not think you can serve and see all that you do without coming home with some PTSD symptoms. It is no different in the civilian population. Some people survive childhood abuse or other traumas without developing full PTSD but it is impossible for it not to stick to you in some way. We are only human right? Take good care of yourself and put yourself as a priority now and then. You need to be cared for too.
        Thanks again.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Thank you for these kind words and the reminder.

        Like

  4. Reblogged this on All that I am, all that I ever was… and commented:
    Excellent article on C-PTSD. Should be required reading for all! 🙂

    Like

  5. Reblogged this on The Invisible F and commented:
    Very informative article on the little known C-PTSD

    Like

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